by Jodi Summers

Bravo! The Port of Long Beach has been recognized as the “Best Green Seaport” in the world at the 28th annual Asian Freight & Supply Chain Awards.

The Port of Long Beach is one of the world’s premier seaports, a primary gateway for trans-Pacific trade and a trailblazer in innovative goods movement, safety and environmental stewardship. The Port is served by 140 shipping lines with connections to 217 seaports worldwide. A major economic engine for the region, the Port handles trade valued at more than $180 billion each year and supports hundreds of thousands of Southern California jobs.

In 2005, the Port of Long adopted a “Green Port Policy,” focusing reducing its impact on the community, wildlife and the environment…with unmitigated success. The POLB is proud of the dramatic improvement in air and water quality thanks to an array of environmental initiatives that include the Clean Trucks, Green Flag Vessel Speed Reduction and Technology Advancement programs.

“This is an honor to be named the AFSCA’s Best Green Seaport. The Port of Long Beach has made great strides in reducing air pollution and improving water quality, and we are committed to doing even more,” said Long Beach Board of Harbor Commissioners President Doug Drummond.

The Port’s growth policy has had tremendous results. The total number of containers handled at the ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles in May increased by 5.6% on a year-over-year basis to 1,288,652 TEUs (twenty-foot equivalent units). This was the 14th consecutive month of at least 1 million TEUs for the San Pedro Bay ports.

The Port of Long Beach’s Green Port Policy is an aggressive, comprehensive and coordinated approach to reduce the negative impacts of Port operations. The Green Port Policy, adopted in 2005, serves as a guide for decision making and established a framework for environmentally friendly Port operations. The policy’s five guiding principles are:

  • Protect the community from harmful environmental impacts of Port operations.
  • Distinguish the Port as a leader in environmental stewardship and compliance.
  • Promote sustainability.
  • Employ best available technology to avoid or reduce environmental impacts.
  • Engage and educate the community.

The Green Port Policy includes six basic program elements, each with an overall goal:

  1. Wildlife – Protect, maintain or restore aquatic ecosystems and marine habitats.
  2. Air – Reduce harmful air emissions from Port activities.
  3. Water – Improve the quality of Long Beach Harbor waters.
  4. Soils/Sediments – Remove, treat, or render suitable for beneficial reuse contaminated soils and sediments in the Harbor District.
  5. Community Engagement – Interact with and educate the community regarding Port operations and environmental programs.
  6. Sustainability – Implement sustainable practices in design and construction, operations, and administrative practices throughout the Port.

The “Green Seaport” honor of the Asian Freight & Supply Chain Awards is reserved for ports that have “demonstrated compliance with green freight transport regulations and environmental standards; investment in green initiatives, technology and action plans; incorporation of environmental requirements in strategic planning; use of a policy on reducing fuel emissions from freight handling operations; and ongoing training of staff in green initiatives and in measures to lower carbon footprints.”

The awards are based on an annual poll of thousands of professionals in freight transportation services. Awards also are given in many categories, including best shipping lines, container terminals, air cargo terminals, airports and rail haulers.

Find out more about the Port of Long Beach’s environmental programs at



Join the conversation! 6 Comments

  1. Cargo container numbers edged up 2.7 percent last month at the Port of Long Beach, making for the Southern California seaport’s busiest May since 2007 by reaching nearly 600,000 container units.

    Terminals handled 599,509 TEUs (twenty-foot equivalent units) overall in May, including 312,439 TEUs of imports, which is a 2.3 percent increase compared to May 2013. Exports were flat with a slight decline of 0.3 percent to 146,702 TEUs. Empty containers rose 7.1 percent to 140,368 TEUs. With imports exceeding exports, empty containers are sent back overseas to be refilled with consumer goods.

    While May was the second consecutive month of increasing volume, Long Beach has seen an increase of just 1.3 percent for the first five months of 2014 compared to the same period last year.

    Last year, against which 2014 is being compared, was the third-busiest year in port history with a total of 6.73 million TEUs.

  2. Thanks to the U.S. housing boom, Asian manufacturers are shipping the most furniture and building materials by containers in seven years.

    U.S. imports of furniture and building materials from Asia, destined for retailers such as Wal-Mart Stores Inc. (WMT) and Target Corp. (TGT), rose 6.3 percent in the first four months of the year, compared with a year earlier, to the most since 2007, according to Japan Maritime Center figures.

  3. Empty Container Depot Opens in Long Beach
    Pier S facility to help relieve congestion

    The Temporary Empty Container Depot on Pier S at the Port of Long Beach opened for business today, Dec. 29, ready to provide a convenient means for truckers to free up truck-trailer chassis they need to move loaded containers out of marine terminals.

    Ongoing congestion caused in part by a lack of available chassis – the wheeled frames used to move shipping containers on the road – has caused delays in shipments. The depot allows chassis to return to servicing the terminals more quickly.

    Located at 2601 Pier S Lane in Long Beach, the 30-acre site is operated by Pasha Stevedoring and Terminals. The depot is scheduled to close March 31, 2015.

    The Port of Long Beach is one of the world’s premier seaports, a gateway for trans-Pacific trade and a trailblazer in goods movement and environmental stewardship. With 140 shipping lines connecting Long Beach to 217 seaports, the Port handles $180 billion in trade annually, supporting hundreds of thousands of Southern California jobs.

  4. Cargo container trade climbed 1.3 percent in 2014, indicating continued economic growth for the U.S. and bringing the Port its third-busiest year ever behind the peak years of 2006 and 2007.
    Last year’s overall volume rose to 6,820,806 TEUs or twenty-foot equivalent units. Imports increased 1.8 percent to 3,517,514 TEUs, exports declined 5.9 percent to 1,604,394 TEUs, while empties rose 8.2 percent to 1,698,898 TEUs. Empty containers are sent overseas to be loaded with cargo.

    For December 2014 alone, the Port moved 567,237 TEUs through the harbor, a 2.6 percent decrease compared to December 2013. Imports dropped 5.1 percent to 276,516 TEUs. Exports fell 11.2 percent to 131,496 TEUs. Empties rose to 159,225 TEUs, an increase of 11.5 percent.

    Port officials attributed the growth in 2014 overall to strong relationships with the shipping industry.

    The Port of Long Beach is one of the world’s premier seaports, a gateway for trans-Pacific trade and a trailblazer in goods movement and environmental stewardship. With 140 shipping lines connecting Long Beach to 217 seaports, the Port handles $180 billion in trade annually, supporting hundreds of thousands of Southern California jobs.

  5. Congestion at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach is being worsened by drivers having to search for the right chassis, the Los Angeles Daily News reports. The chassis, which are the wheeled metal frames that allow trucks to tow containers to and from the port’s terminals, are vital to helping move the cargo to stores across the nation.

  6. The total number of containers handled at the ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles in August 2015 rose by 12.0 percent on a year-over-year basis to 1,490,320 TUEs (twenty-foot equivalent units). Cargo volumes for the combined ports have largely returned to their underlying trends following the heavy slowdowns resulting from labor disruptions. Total containers at the Port of Los Angeles were up by 3.8 percent on a year-over-year basis, making it the busiest August since 2006, while volumes at the Port of Long Beach hit record levels (for the second consecutive month), surging 22.8 percent in August when compared to last year.

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About Jodi Summers

Jodi Summers
Sotheby’s International Realty

Jodi Summers Bio

With $100,000,000 in listed inventory, Jodi Summers understands the coastal commercial real estate market. A top producer with Sotheby’s International Realty, Jodi knows finance, rules, regulations, procedures and methods. She is accurate, knowledgeable, timely and aware of how government shapes the cities of Southern California.

Jodi is born in Brooklyn, raised in and around Manhattan – the family business was marketing, Madison Avenue style. Childhood math quiz questions calculated demographic and psychographic percentages or analyzed the allocation of adverting dollars. Word games were for devising slogans.

An honors graduate from the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism at Arizona State University, Jodi moved to California to achieve her goal of living by the beach with a palm tree and a hibiscus bush in her yard.
She thrived as an entrepreneur in the entertainment, media and marketing industries. One of her books, “Marking and Marketing Music,” is in second edition.

“My marketing and communication skills have proven to be a true gift when it comes to promoting real estate,” observes Jodi. “And I am consistently able to get an exceptionally high price per square foot for my sellers.”

Discipline (Jodi holds a Black Belt in Tae Kwon Do), organization, motivation, excellent communication skills and knowing & satisfying the needs of her clients have been her essentials for running a successful business. A passion for investment real estate explains her emphasis in asset-yielding properties.

Her team joined Sotheby’s International Realty for the company’s powerful brand and stellar reputation.
“We offer the broad market knowledge needed to assist clients in formulating a sound acquisition strategy,” Jodi amplifies. “Together, we evaluate various markets, property types and neighborhoods to devise a customized approach that meets each client’s specific objectives.”

Jodi is a member of the Action Apartment Association of Westside income property owners, the Santa Monica Conservancy historic preservation society, the Ocean Park Association, the Friends of Sunset Park community group, the Real Estate Investors Club of L.A., and the Culver City Rock & Mineral Club. Members of her team are fluent in Spanish and Italian.

“Our reputation assures your satisfaction.”


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